Home renovations usually accomplish one of three goals. They can fix a problem with a home. Make it a better place to live. Or help improve the resale value of a home. In many cases, they can actually do two or three of those things all at the same time. Identifying potential home renovations is usually easy, but knowing what you can do to pay for your home renovations is another.

Sell Extra Things

Does your home have too many things in it? If one of your home renovations is going to need some working room to even happen, you might need to move a lot of stuff around. As you do it, find anything that could have value on the used consumer goods market and start selling it. You might decide to have a garage or yard sale, but you might also find local consignment shops to work with. Selling online through Amazon and eBay is always possible.

Refinance Your Home Mortgage

If you need a lot of money for your home renovations, then you might just want to consider refinancing your home mortgage. Whether you work with American Financing or another provider, you might be able to tap into the equity you’ve built up in your mortgage to have access to cash that you can use to finance projects that improve your home value. This can be a real win-win since you’re using your home value to raise itself even more.

Rent Out Space

Depending on how big your home is, you might be able to rent out some space to potential tenants. Whether you have a roommate share your primary space with you, or you rent out an apartment in the basement, over the garage, or a mother-in-law suite, having someone pay you to rent each month can generate hundreds of dollars every several weeks that you can use towards financing renovations. The downside is that you do become a landlord and share your property with someone you might not know. They also might not like living in a home where projects are happening.

Paying for Home Renovations

Paying for your home renovations does mean giving up something in exchange for the project. That might mean selling off personal possessions, refinancing the mortgage, or having someone move in. You’ll have to decide for yourself whether each possibility is worth it in the long run.

By Lizzie Weakley

Lizzie Weakley is a freelance writer from Columbus, Ohio. In her free time, she enjoys the outdoors and walks in the park with her three-year-old husky, Snowball.

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